UPRISING. How To Build A Brand And Change The World By Sparking Cultural Movements.

UPRISING. How To Build A Brand And Change The World By Sparking Cultural Movements. By Scott Goodson. $16.98 on Amazon

Uprising Book

“ Uprising is a must-read for anyone who wants to start a mass movement like Macintosh. Whether you’re one person with an idea or a global brand, Scott can show you the way to enchant, evangelize and enroll followers. ”

GUY KAWASAKI, AUTHOR OF ENCHANTMENT AND FORMER CHIEF EVANGELIST OF APPLE

“ Scott Goodson and his StrawberryFrog colleagues have found the secret to plugging into Purpose with a capial P: find out what moves people to action, then create a way to support and enhance that movement with your product, service or craft. I call that a winning strategy.”

DANIEL H. PINK, AUTHOR OF DRIVE AND A WHOLE NEW MIND

“ One of the smartest thinkers on branding on one of the most important developments in that critical intersection between culture and marketing. For any challenger needing to change the conversation about their category, Scott’s blueprint for creating, enabling and respectfully flourishing in a movement is essential stuff.”

ADAM MORGAN, AUTHOR OF EATING THE BIG FISH: HOW CHALLENGER BRANDS CAN COMPETE AGAINST BRAND LEADERS

“ Until now, cultural movements have been sporadic and random. Uprising reveals an insider’s look at how these movements actually occur — and, how to make them happen for your brand and your purpose.”

SALLY HOGSHEAD, AUTHOR OF FASCINATE AND CREATOR OF HOWTOFASCINATE.COM

Q & A with the author of Uprising, Scott Goodson:

Q: Why should marketers care about Movement Marketing? - (and is it different from social media marketing?)


Anyone with an idea or new product or brand should care because now anyone can create mass movements that can accelerate a brands rise to dominance with a Movement Marketing approach.  It’s proven and it now can propel a brand or an idea across the globe.


Marketers should care because it is, in many ways, the future of marketing. For a variety of reasons discussed in the book – having to do with the rise of social media and other changes – conventional advertising is losing effectiveness. Brands must learn how to build a passionate following, AKA a movement. This involves much more than just doing social media marketing—though that is certainly one of the primary tools in the toolbox.


Q: Will Movement Marketing work in a country in which the primary electronic communication is conducted on a smartphone?  

Movements need to be sparked with an idea on the rise in culture. Then tools can be used to spread this idea to a wider audience. In some societies this was done by word of mouth. Now mobile social media enabled phones makes it easier. Marketers and entrepreneurs can learn from the Uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt. Social media is mobile today. Most people access their social media via mobile not desk top. 


Q: What should we take away from your experiences in Movement Marketing?

That it works. Every brand we’ve done this with – from a small Japanese athletic shoe brand all the way up to Procter & Gamble and PepsiCo – has seen the results of creating movements, and many of these companies have begun to shift their marketing models, based on this. Anyone can learn from this- a small entrepreneur starting a new social media brand or someone running for politics, a marketer or a CEO or people who want to be leaders in their community or their business.


Q: What was the biggest surprise writing the book?

The biggest surprise was that, as I was writing it, events happening all around the world seemed to be echoing the themes in the book. There were “uprisings” happening everywhere from the Middle East to my own town, in Manhattan with Occupy Wall Street - the Uprisings recently in Moscow. And while most of these were social movements, not marketing movements, they reinforced much of what I’ve always believed and known about movements in general. There’s a lot that marketers can learn from the events going on all around us today


Q: You’ve used the term “revolutionary times” to describe the period we’re living in – what does it mean for businesses to be operating in such a volatile environment?

It means they must embrace the change that’s happening – in these times, people will look to brands to be leaders and change agents. People will pay attention to how you conduct yourself, what you believe in, what you’re willing to take a stand on. If they like what they see, they’ll rally around your brand.